Document set '470'

Transcript style:

other pages

1 / 2
2 / 2
Glenn Hall 5 mo 6th 1832      We were all anticipating a joyful meeting with our dear Joseph in two days more when thy kind letter arive'd which informed us we must still live in a state of suspence render'd more painful by the conviction; he is not fit to travel which some of the family had not been willing to admit; H particularly seem'd as tho she could scarce wait his arrival, I often told her she should not feel so sanguine, as I considerd his comeing very uncertain in his present precarious state of health, but when thy letter arrived, I found I was not myself prepared for the dissapointment, and could not read the information without many tears. I often think it is strange we who have live'd so long in this world of uncertainty, and many tryals should not learn more wisdom, "and apprised that to happyest attachments below, a sad sepperation full shurely ensues;" would strive to govern our feelings better, but so it is, and if every thing of the kind has the desire'd tendency of weaning our affections from this world and placing them on a state where there is no more varibliness or shadow of changeing it matters not how many tryals we have to pass thr'o -- I feel very much oblig'd my dear cousin For the particular information the gives us, of J illness and the Drs treatment, for his kind attention, and the interested you have manifested for him, we feel deeply indeted; I know Joseph posesses a grateful heart and am concious will make all the return in his power, for your kindness, but I am also aware he must addGlenn Hall 5 <sup>mo</sup> 6<sup>th</sup> 1832
<p-bgn>We were all anticipating a joyful
meeting with our dear Joseph in two days
more when thy kind letter arive'd which informed
us we must still live in a state
of suspence render'd more painful by the
conviction; he is not fit to travel which
some of the family had not been willing
to admit; H particularly seem'd as tho she
could scarce wait his a<add>r</add>rival, I often told her
she should not feel so sanguine, as I considerd
his comeing very uncertain in his present
precarious state of health, but when thy
letter a<add>r</add>rived, I found I was not myself prepared
for the dissapointment, and could not
read the information without many tears.
I often think it is strange we who have live'd
so long in this world of uncertainty, and many
tryals should not learn more wisdom, "and apprised
that to happyest attachments below, a sad sepperation
full shurely ensues;" would strive to govern
our feelings better, but so it is, and if every
thing of the kind has the desire'd tendency
of weaning our affections from this world
and placing them on a state where there is
no more varibliness or shadow of changeing
it matters not how many tryals we have to pass
thr'o -- I feel very much oblig'd my dear cousin
For the particular information the gives
us, of J illness and the Dr<sup>s</sup> treatment, for his
kind attention, and the interes<del>ted</del> you have manifested
for him, we feel deeply indeted; I know
Joseph posesses a grateful heart and am concious
will make all the return in his power, for your
kindness, but I am also aware he must add
greatly to your care and if very ill must require much attention, I do hope my dear sister whos health is so poor, will not injure herself by waiting on him too much -- Thee has not mentioned the name of Js complaint, but I infer from the mode of treatment it is head dropsy or inflamation of the brain I am aware in either case his return to us soon, if ever, is very uncertain, -- If he is taken worse altho I am satisfied every thing will be done for him that can to alleviate his suffering, and have full confidence in the Drs skill, yet it would feel at times almost more than I could support to[?] be so far seperated from him, and I do hope my dear cousin should this be the case some of you will add to the many obligations we alredy feel under to you, by writing frequently and letting[?] us know how you are getting along -- with endeared love to cousins Martha Mary and thy self[?] I remain thy affectionate aunt P S tur[?]
     I feel much obliged my dear sister for thy affectionate and sympathizing note in cousin[?] Hannahs letter, and kind and interested attention[?] to my dear child, I am fully aware of thy talent[?] for nursing in sickness, and should I be taken very ill while with you I hope thee will recolect thy own delicate health and not exert thyself too much. -- I could not feel less anxiety with[?] his being sick any where from home, than I do in his present situation, as I am convinc'd his own mind is at ease with you, but truely[?] as thee observes it is only a mother who has been placed in the same situation can realize a mothers feelings -- I often think there is too little communication between us we know scarcly any thing of each others feelings[?] or concerns; when we do recieve a few lines from[?] any of you they meet with a cordial welcome and[?] I am convinced serve to strengthen the cords of affection, and I hope and believe that interest for each[?] others welfare which proceeds from a better source than[?] the natural bonds of kindred is still kept alive among[?] us, with endeared love to my dear brother and thyself, in which my D S joins I remain thy affectionate sister P S
greatly to your care and if very ill must require
much attention, I do hope my dear sister whos
health is so poor, will not injure herself by
waiting on him too much -- Thee has not
mentioned the name of J<sup>s</sup> complaint, but I
infer from the mode of treatment it is
head dropsy or inflamation of the brain
I am aware in either case his return
to us soon, if ever, is very uncertain, --
If he is taken worse altho I am satisfied
every thing will be done for him that can
to alleviate his suffering, and have full
confidence in the Dr<sup>s</sup> skill, yet it would
feel at times almost more than I could support <unclear>to</unclear>
be so far seperated from him, and I do hope my
dear <add>cousin</add> should this be the case some of you will
add to the many obligations we alredy feel
under to you, by writing frequently and <unclear>letting</unclear>
us know how you are getting along -- with
endeared love to cousins Martha Mary and thy <unclear>self</unclear>
I remain thy affectionate aunt P S<unclear> tur</unclear><p-end>
<p-bgn>I feel much obliged my dear sister for thy
affectionate and sympathizing note in <unclear>cousin</unclear>
Hannahs letter, and kind and interested <unclear>attention</unclear>
to my dear child, I am fully aware of thy <unclear>talent</unclear>
for nursing in sickness, and should I be taken
very ill while with you I hope thee will recolect
thy own delicate health and not exert thyself
too much. -- I could not feel less anxiety <unclear>with</unclear>
his being sick any where from home, than I
do in his present situation, as I am convinc'd
his own mind is at ease with you, but <unclear>truely</unclear>
as thee observes it is only a mother who has
been placed in the same situation can realize
a mothers feelings -- I often think
there is too little communication between us
we know scarcly any thing of each others <unclear>feelings</unclear>
or concerns; when we do recieve a few lines <unclear>from</unclear>
any of you they meet with a cordial welcome <unclear>and</unclear>
I am convinced serve to strengthen the cords of affection,
and I hope and believe that interest for <unclear>each</unclear>
others welfare which proceeds from a better source <unclear>than</unclear>
the natural bonds of kindred is still kept alive <unclear>among</unclear>
us, with endeared love to my dear brother and thyself, in
which my D S joins I remain thy affectionate sister P S